I believe in soul mates

I believe one is able to meet people from different ways of life and know immediately, after  exchanging a couple of  words, or looks, or even just being with them, that they are your soul mates.  Not in the romantic way that one reads in books, though.  

I believe our soul is the energy within us and this weekend I shared my energy with two beautiful ladies.  One is a teacher from Germany who is observing my classroom and exchanging ideas etc…the other was a software analyst from Kenya.

Why do these things matter to me? I don’t know but I’ve always gotten happy when I feel this connection with someone, especially when it is spontaneous.

On another note, I love my man.  He worked all day Saturday and got home to me late at night.  He was really tired but didn’t want me to eat dinner alone so he sat there and ate salad while he told me about his day.  I was going to wash dishes and he told me to go sit down…(even after I told him I’d wash them because he was tired).  We watched “The Revenants” a really good French series that a friend recommended. 

It’s not the fact that he washed dishes, or that he sat with me for dinner and then stayed to watch the show…it’s how he looks at me, touches me, his scent.  I love everything about him.  My beautiful man.

Lavender Lemonade for this coming summer! looks yum!

"When a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too."

Bill Moyers in the foreword to this beautiful photographic love letter to libraries (via explore-blog)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

(Source: archatlas, via revolutionizeed)

positivelypersistentteach:

iridessence:

astrodidact:

People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 
8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates
Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.
When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.
After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.
Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.
Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.
http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/


;~; little babies changing the world

Way to be!

Hope in humanity restored.

positivelypersistentteach:

iridessence:

astrodidact:

People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 

8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates

Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.

When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.

After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.

Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.

Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.

http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/

;~; little babies changing the world

Way to be!

Hope in humanity restored.

"Be curious. Read widely. Try new things. I think that a lot of what people call intelligence just boils down to curiosity."

Aaron Swartz

A simple recipe for making life delicious. A fine thought, Aaron.

 (via kevinthebigapple)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

"Common Core testing prepares our students for what they’ll face as adults: pointless stress and confusion."

STEPHEN COLBERT, The Colbert Report (via inothernews)

Okay, I’m going to say this again.  And I will say it every time this appears on my dashboard because if you are tired of people speaking poorly of education and teachers than you need to stop also.  You need to understand the common core and the politics around it because it is your job to.

There is no such thing as “Common Core Testing.”  The Common Core are learning standards.  A standard is a level of quality and is used to gauge learning by setting a bar that is the expected level a student should reach.

To gauge learning you need to assess a student’s performance, skills, and knowledge.  An assessment is any way to collect information about students, curriculum, schools, etc. to help make a decision on things like effectiveness of lesson or how well a student understands a concept.

(Kudos to you if you are still reading!)

Thus, a standard is not an assessment. We need assessments to gauge student learning in relation to a standard.  If the assessment does not assess the objective or standard then that is an invalid assessment and the result will not be reliable.  Thus, the teacher can make no valid interpretation of the results.

So, yes, standardized tests are going to assess the common core standards.  They have to.  The fact that these tests are standardized and have high stakes for teachers has nothing to do with the common core.  Programs such as Race to the Top are causing states states to push the standardized assessments.  Why? MONEY. They must adopt the assessments as well as the standards to get the money.

Want the plain and simple?  Common Core Standards, don’t worry about them. Standardized state assessments on the other hand, we could do without.  

(via aredhat)

Common Core Standards are being PUSHED by text book companies to make a few more bucks with NOW ALIGNED WITH COMMON CORE STANDARDS textbooks, tests, test prep, RtI curriculum, etc.  

Except they are mediocre standards at must and at least in the K-3 are always developmentally appropriate.  For example, they leave out patterning in K all together.  I know a few high school teachers that aren’t fans.   The new common core standard idea I think came about BECAUSE of this atmosphere of standardized tests we’ve come to know.  I don’t think if there wasn’t such an emphasis on the tests that Common Core would have been created in the first place.

(via positivelypersistentteach)

(via positivelypersistentteach)

spokemnemosyne:

We are those who leave. The numerous
cloud that fades away in the sunset
is our own image. Unceasingly
the rose turns into another rose.
You are cloud, you are sea, you are oblivion.
You are also that which you have lost.

Jorge Luis Borges, Clouds